Step 3 - Child toothcare - keeping childrens teeth clean with Brush Baby

Healthy Grown-up Smiles

By the time you little one turns 3, they should be showing off a full set of teeth when they smile. Looking after their baby teeth is just as important as looking after their adult teeth when they start to come through. Those hard-earned baby teeth will start to fall out to make room for adult teeth between when your child is between 3 and 6 years old. Encouraging a daily dental care routine for your little one now will help protect their existing baby teeth and emerging adult teeth from decay, as well as giving them self confidence, preventing bad breath and scary visits to the dentist! You’ll also be helping them to develop healthy habits that they will take with them into adulthood so that they can keep that healthy happy smile for ever.

Why clean children teeth?

It's important brush to your little ones teeth everyday to help start a healthy brushing routine and help stop the build of decay causing bacteria. It is recommended that everybody brush their teeth twice a day – in the morning and before going to bed at night.  

What do I need to do?

  • Brush brush brush! Until your child is around 6 years old, you’ll need to do it for them, and even after that you should always supervise brushing time to ensure they are doing a good job. Children need to brush their teeth twice a day for 2 minutes. Try brushing your child's teeth standing behind them as you’ll be able to see more clearly.

  • Floss once a day. Food can get caught between your little one’s teeth and flossing will help to remove this, preventing gum disease and bad breath. Introduce flossing when two teeth start to touch. At first, gently floss their front teeth and then gradually include their back teeth over time.

  • Replace toothbrushes as soon as bristles start to fray or splay, or at least every 2 - 3 months.

  • Choose a children's toothpaste that they like the taste of and try to avoid stronger flavours. Only use a PEA SIZED amount of children's toothpaste, so that they are getting the correct amount of fluoride. Try to use a toothpaste with fluoride and xylitol, as it will help to reduce sugar acids that rot little teeth.

Brush-Baby products to help you

 

KidzSonic Electric Toothbrush

The perfect partner for brushing time, with flashing lights and a two minute timer

 

 

Kids Mild Spearmint Toothpaste

With a mild mint flavour that kids will love. Suitable for Vegans and Vegetarians.

 




FAQ's

Stage 3 - Kids - Grown-up Smiles

Transition from baby to adult teeth

Your child’s baby teeth will eventually become wobbly and to fall out to make way for their adult teeth to grow, This process can last 6 years or more! Baby teeth tend to fall out in the same order in which they came in and the process is not painful. Some kids lose their first tooth as early as 4 or as late as 7, but it's also possible for a child to reach 7 or 8 without losing any baby teeth at all! Generally, the younger your child was when their teeth arrived, the earlier they will tend to fall out. If they begin to lose teeth much earlier than the age of 4, pop along to the dentist to make sure there's no underlying issue. When your child does feel their first wobbly tooth, encourage them to gently wiggle the tooth but not to yank it before it’s ready to fall out on its own. Before you know it, the tooth fairy will become a regular visitor!

Baby teeth have to fall out to make way for adult teeth to grow, but it won’t happen overnight. You can expect this process to last 6 years or more!

Your child’s new adult teeth may look bigger, especially the first few to arrive. That's because they are! Adult teeth also tend to be less white than baby teeth and have pronounced ridges because they haven't been used yet for biting and chewing. Occasionally, a couple of new teeth come in before the old ones have fallen out, creating two rows of pearly whites. This is a temporary stage, sometimes called shark's teeth. It’s nothing to worry about but don’t forget that brushing and flossing will be more important than ever during this phase.

It can do. Decay in your little one’s baby teeth can cause abscesses that harm their permanent teeth developing inside their gums. In cases where children have a tooth extracted, they are more likely to develop orthodontic problems as the premature loss of primary teeth can affect the alignment of permanent teeth.

Daily Dental Care for Kids

Your child won’t be able to brush their teeth on their own until they are 6, so you will need to help them until then. You should aim to brush their teeth for 2 minutes, twice a day. Once they are brushing on their own, you should still supervise all your child’s toothbrushing until they are a bit older to make sure they are doing a good job.

Two minutes can seem like a long time, we know! Why not set a countdown timer on your phone? Or play them a video on your phone or tablet that lasts for 2 minutes? It’s also worth checking out toothbrushing songs, videos or cartoons online as there are some great options around to keep them entertained.

Firstly, don’t worry! Kids like to assert their independence and sometimes they choose to do this at brushing time in particular. Here are some things to try:

- Take your child shopping with you when you buy new toothbrushes and have them choose two, so you can give them a choice at brushing time. They will love the feeling of being in charge!

- Try experimenting with different flavour toothpastes, like our Tutti Frutti flavour.

- Try to time your morning routine so that your child brushes their teeth at the same time as other members of the household. It will make the world of difference to see the adults cleaning their teeth too!

- Let your little one brush their favourite toy’s ‘teeth’ first or let them ‘help’ you to brush your teeth. Just be careful not to share toothbrushes with them.

- Don’t forget to shower them with praise when brushing goes well. You could even keep a progress chart and reward them with a treat at the end of each week/

Firstly, ensure that your little one’s toothpaste contains the right amount of fluoride for their age. For children between 3 and 6, just use a pea-sized amount of toothpaste. Remember to put the toothpaste on your child’s toothbrush yourself until they can do it properly themselves and as with all bathroom products, keep toothpaste tubes out of the reach of little hands./

Lots of kids like to suck a dummy or their thumb when they are little as it has a soothing effect, particularly when they are drifting off to sleep. Most kids will stop sucking their thumb naturally by about 4 years old - it’s only after this point that you might need to think about weaning them off, as it could effect their teeth. With a dummy, it’s important to try to wean your little one off earlier than that if you can. Here are some tips to try:

- To start with, try just restricting thumb- or dummy-sucking to night time or nap times only. Then you can eventually work towards cutting down at these times too.

- You could start a progress chart with stickers for every day they go without. Then reward your child with a treat at the end of the week.

- Keep track of when your child wants to suck their dummy or thumb - if they are tired, hungry or anxious, it’s worth try to find other ways to alleviate these or distract them at these times.

- If you’re going away on holiday, you could use it as an opportunity to leave their dummy at home. You’ll have lots to distract your little one whilst you’re away and by the time you’re home they might have forgotten all about it!

- You could try transitioning them to something else like a teddy or favourite soft toy for comfort instead.

- Try to remain patient and understanding - it’s a big transition for them after all. - Ask your dentist to explain to your little one that it’s time to stop and why they should - it’s amazing what a few words from an expert can do!/

Xylitol is a toothache superhero that works wonders for our teeth. Every time you eat, the bacteria present in your mouth digest the sugars of your food to produce acids. These acids eat away at your tooth enamel, causing decay. So how can we avoid this? Along with healthy dental care habits, Xylitol can help prevent decay-causing bacteria from producing the acids that rot teeth. This is because the bacteria are unable to digest Xylitol and so no nasty acid is produced. Not just that, but fluoride works better to repair and strengthen tooth enamel when Xylitol is present. Check out one of our Xylitol-enriched toothpastes to get some of this superhero substance into your little one’s mouth - it will also help them develop fewer cavities than using fluoride-only toothpaste.

Visiting the Dentist

Dentists recommend taking your child to the dentist regularly - ensure you check with your dentist on how often they recommend. During these visits your dentist will check your child's mouth and teeth and will diagnose any problems. Getting your child used to going to the Dentist will help them to feel relaxed and know that there’s nothing to fear.

The dentist will take a look around your child's mouth to check for decay and look at their gums, jaw, and bite. The dentist or the hygienist may clean your child’s teeth if they think it’s needed. They will talk to you about good oral hygiene habits and give you the chance to ask any questions you may have about brushing, flossing, thumb-sucking or tooth-friendly foods. Scribble down any questions you have beforehand and take them to the appointment with you so you don’t forget.

It’s important to take your little one to the dentist as part of regular check-ups, not just when there is something wrong. Getting your child used to going to the dentist regularly will help them to feel relaxed when they visit in the future. Don’t forget to take your child to the dentist when you have a check-up too. This will help them get used to the sights, smells and sounds of the dental practice and to feel more comfortable about going to the dentist in general. If you are worried, try taking one of their favourite books or toys to make them feel more comfortable

Some children who suffer with asthma need to use an inhaler. However, many of the powders in puffers are acidic and can unfortunately erode tooth enamel. If your child uses an inhaler, it’s worth teaching them to rinse with water after using each use, to help prevent future problems with their teeth. Cleaning their teeth with suitable fluoride toothpaste will also help to protect their teeth because the fluoride strengthens tooth enamel. Don’t forget to tell your dentist if your child uses an inhaler and ensure you take them for regular check-ups.

Despite our best efforts as parents, children have a knack of finding ways to bump their heads, scape their knees and shut their fingers in things! Sometimes they can even find ways to chip a tooth, knock one out or drive a tooth back up into their gum. Here’s what to do if you ever face a tooth-related emergency:

- Try not to panic! Whilst you’re comforting your little one, take a nice deep breath before you take action.

- If their mouth is bleeding, stem the flow with a clean moist flannel.

- If a baby tooth has been knocked out, don’t put it back into the socket as this could block the way for the adult tooth underneath.

- Call the dentist straightaway and make an emergency appointment - they will be able to assess what damage has been done and advise on the best treatment for your child.

- Try not to feel guilty - some children are more accident-prone than others, but remember accidents can happen to any one of us!

The first thing is to pop to the dentist for a check up. Your dentist will be able to identify whether these white marks are due to decay or something else. They can be due to the way the minerals in the tooth have been lain down as the tooth developed. As always, ensure you are brushing your little one’s teeth twice a day with age-appropriate fluoride toothpaste.

Choosing the right toothbrush and toothpaste

There are lots of different toothbrushes on the market. The important thing to remember is that your child needs a toothbrush that will clean effectively deep down between their teeth. If your child has a mix of baby and adult teeth, or crooked teeth, then the FlossBrush is ideal - it has longer bristles so can clean in between teeth. You could also opt for an electric toothbrush like the KidzSonic or Go-Kidz toothbrush. They both have a two minute timer and 30 second pulse, so you know exactly how long you need to brush for.

It’s easy to forget to replace your family’s toothbrushes when there’s a million other things to do to keep a household running. However, it’s important to remember that toothbrushes can spread infection, so here are our golden rules for keeping those brushes at their best.

- Replace your child’s toothbrush after they are ill with a cold, flu, a tummy bug or after any mouth infections (and yours if you are ill too!).

- Don’t forget to keep an eye on your family’s toothbrushes and replace them when bristles start to fray, or least every 2 - 3 months.

- Try to keep everyone’s toothbrushes in a clean, dry, airy place so that they can dry out between uses. Ideally the toothbrush heads shouldn’t touch each other.

Electric toothbrushes can be a great option to combat brushing battles, as they can introduce some fun into the toothbrushing routine. Brush-Baby electric brushes have lights and a two minute timer, so you know exactly how long you have to brush for. Don’t forget to replace toothbrush heads when bristles start to fray, or least every 2 - 3 months.

Minty flavours can actually be quite strong for little tastebuds, so it’s worth experimenting with different flavour toothpastes if your child isn’t keen. Our Tutti Frutti toothpaste is often a big hit with small mouths.

Between the ages 3 and 6, you only need a pea-sized amount of toothpaste to brush your little one’s teeth and their toothpaste should have 1000-1350 parts per million Fluoride. After the age of 6, continue using a pea-sized amount of toothpaste but choose a toothpaste with 1350-1500 parts per million Fluoride.

Flossing

The best way to keep your kid’s smile happy and healthy is to establish good oral care habits as early as you can. Alongside helping them to brush twice a day, you will need to floss their teeth to ensure a good clean deep down between their teeth. This is especially important if they have a mix of baby and adult teeth, or crooked teeth.

Let your little one see you flossing every day - it's the best way to set a great example of healthy oral hygiene. To start off, invest in some flossettes or floss picks, and begin with your child’s front teeth. As your little one gets more used to their front teeth being flossed, you can then start to include the back teeth as well. If brushing is still a battle and flossing might be a step too far, the FlossBrush has specially designed 'flossing bristles' to help clean both the surface and in-between teeth.

Additional Questions

Many parents/caregivers of children with autism and special needs have found the range of Brush-Baby products extremely useful when toothbrushing.

Our toothpastes are SLS-free, and therefore non-foaming, have a gel-like consistency (you only need to use a pea-sized amount of toothpaste) and the fruity and milder mint formulations are more palatable to sensitive tastebuds. They’re paraben-free and safe if swallowed. Texture is key to a good toothbrushing experience and the toothbrushes within the range have been designed to make toothbrushing as effective but pleasurable as possible. The toothbrush heads are smaller than conventional toothbrushes and are easier to manoeuvre within mouths, in and around teeth and into the gumline. Long handles can also be held by child and caregiver with ease. Flashing lights and timers on electric can attract and maintain a child’s interest or alternatively can be switched off for a manual and quieter experience.

Our Chewable Toothbrush originally designed for toddlers to help with their developing teeth during the teething process has also found fans of children who love to ‘chew’ on a toothbrush too. Put some toothpaste on the medical-grade silicone ‘bristles’ and they will do a great job of cleaning teeth whilst the toothbrush is ‘chewed’ and can also access those difficult to reach back teeth too.

Many parents/caregivers of children with autism and special needs have found the range of Brush-Baby products extremely useful when toothbrushing.

Our toothpastes are SLS-free, and therefore non-foaming, have a gel-like consistency (you only need to use a pea-sized amount of toothpaste) and theIt’s all about control. Little ones love to exert their authority- but why do they have to do it at the most inopportune moments?! It could become a ‘battle of the wills’, but keep persevering and you’ll get there. -Imitation is the sincerest form of flattery. So brush your own teeth at the same time and watch them copy you.

- FOMO – Ignore them and brush your own teeth. They will want to join in!

- Play a game – to see who can open their mouth the widest

- Find a story which talks about creatures opening their mouths and emulate the story

- Use the novelty of the light on the electric toothbrush to show the way into the back of the mouth – use on yourself, your partner as a ‘willing’ candidate or a favourite toy.

- If all else fails, don’t worry – if you can get some palatable toothpaste in their mouths (Brush-Baby offer fruity and milder mint formulations of toothpaste, which are gel-like and safe if swallowed) and let it ‘pool’ around their teeth, gums and gumline – this is better than doing nothing at all. fruity and milder mint formulations are more palatable to sensitive tastebuds. They’re paraben-free and safe if swallowed.

Texture is key to a good toothbrushing experience and the toothbrushes within the range have been designed to make toothbrushing as effective but pleasurable as possible. The toothbrush heads are smaller than conventional toothbrushes and are easier to manoeuvre within mouths, in and around teeth and into the gumline. Long handles can also be held by child and caregiver with ease. Flashing lights and timers on electric can attract and maintain a child’s interest or alternatively can be switched off for a manual and quieter experience.

Our Chewable Toothbrush originally designed for toddlers to help with their developing teeth during the teething process has also found fans of children who love to ‘chew’ on a toothbrush too. Put some toothpaste on the medical-grade silicone ‘bristles’ and they will do a great job of cleaning teeth whilst the toothbrush is ‘chewed’ and can also access those difficult to reach back teeth too.